iMusic Live

Apr 30 2010

I’ve been intrigued by the tiny music applications on the iPod. They’re fun to play but you can’t really make serious music on them, right? Well, maybe not, unless you have the super powers of iPod Girl!

Then, I saw the iPad, and the first thing I thought was, “Wouldn’t it be cool if somebody developed some music applications for that.” I can imagine myself relaxing on the couch writing beats, with everything I need directly on the screen. Or, better yet, playing a couple of these live in a club. For example, one on either side of a DJ mixer. How cool would that be? Sure, neat idea, but we’ll see when this becomes reality, probably not for a long time.

Well, I had the right idea, but, wow, was my projected time line off. Korg just released the iElectribe for iPad. It looks really cool. I’m nearly ready to drop some cash for an iPad just so I can run this app. I think this is the future of laptop synths and music making programs. Rather than having one Korg Kaoss unit sitting on my desk, next to an Access Virus, next to a Dave Smith Tetra, next to an Adrenalinn, next to a . . . well, you get the idea. Instead of all this, I’d have one or two iPads sitting on my desk ready to be turned into any effect device or synth I can imagine. Obviously, this level of power and connectivity in an iPad is still a long ways off, but I can see the future and it looks fabulous!

iELECTRIBE

KORG’s first dedicated iPad musical instrument app!

For over a decade, Korg’s Electribe•R has been go-to gear for creative musicians from around the world and across multiple electronic and dance music genres. Now, you can take the power of the Electribe•R with you thanks to iElectribe, Korg’s first dedicated app; bringing the fun of analog-synth style beat making to your iPad. Best of all, the iElectribe takes full advantage of iPad’s 9.7 inch multi touch display to deliver a new style of musical instrument.

Main Features
Faithful recreation of the Electribe•R’s entire sound engine and sequencer

64 Preset patterns ready for immediate use

8 Supercharged effects

Advanced Motion Sequencing takes the iElectribe to new frontiers

Available now at Apple’s App Store (inside iTunes Store) for a special introductory price of $ 9.99 (US Dollars). Promotional pricing expires June 30, 2010 (regular price is $19.99 USD).

Classic must-have Korg dance gear, now available as a dedicated iPad application

Since its debut in 1999, the aggressive sound, unique functionality, and intuitive beat-building style of the Korg Electribe series has continued to make it a favorite of creative artists around the world. Over the years, the Electribe series has continued to evolve in new directions. The vacuum-tube equipped Electribe•MX and SX went on sale in 2003, followed by the updated MKII versions of the Electribe•A and Electribe•R. The year 2010 marks another chapter for the Electribe family with the iElectribe – one of the world’s first dedicated iPad musical instrument applications.

While fun to use, the iElectribe is no toy; it brings to the iPad the legendary capabilities of the Electribe series. Sound creation is easy and intuitive. Simply touch the step-sequencer’s sixteen individual step keys to quickly start a groove, pick another part and repeat. This simple and understandable interface offers an intuitive “hardware” feel that will captivate the imagination of anyone – those familiar with the Electribe’s power, and those who are experiencing it for the first time!

Faithful recreation of the Electribe•R’s entire sound engine and sequencer
Like its hardware counterpart, the iElectribe offers a four-part percussion synthesizer and a four-part PCM synthesizer. The percussion synthesizer features analog synth-style versatility, including exciting cross modulation! The sample-based PCM parts deliver realistic drum hits, cymbals, and more. Using the Accent function adds emphasis where you need it – vital for creating compelling grooves. All in all, that’s eight programmable parts combined with the easy-to-use 16-step sequencer, so anyone can start creating powerful beats instantly!

64 preset patterns ready for immediate use
The 64 preset patterns include familiar patterns from the Electribe•R as well as new patterns created especially for the iElectribe. The preset patterns cover a wide variety of dance music styles including techno, house, electro, trance, drum ‘n’ bass, dubstep, hip-hop, and R&B. Of course, there is plenty of room to program patterns that are all your own.

Supercharged Master Effect with 8 effect types

The Master Effect has been enhanced from the original Electribe•R, and has been optimized for use in today’s music scene. The eight effect types can spice up your beats in a variety of ways that can become indispensable. Included are a chorus/flanger that fits any type of sound; a tempo-matching BPM delay; plus effects such as a grain shifter and decimator which can dramatically transform the sound.

Advanced Motion Sequencing makes patterns come alive
Simply stated, Motion Sequencing records all of your sound enhancing knob-twisting and tweaking so it can be memorized and replayed as part of a pattern. The knob motion of all parameters, for each and every part, can be recorded – so you can go wild and create diverse and complex patterns like never before.

    “Or, better yet, playing a couple of these live in a club. For example, one on either side of a DJ mixer. How cool would that be?”

    I believe she has already answered this for you Erik: Rana Sobhany June

    http://www.destroythesilence.com/

    or as I like to call her, “The First Lady of iPad DJ”

    Cheers,

    Totally, that’s what I’m talking about!

    And I would add, here’s a video of Rana demoing the iPads in a DJ set up.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHPmcU13_mU
    Pretty freaking cool. The future is here.

    OK, so that video above explores the potential of DJing and live PA with the iPad. Here’s one about actually making music with the iPad, using it as a wireless MIDI controller with Logic! I’m going to have to give it up to Apple on this one.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhH3AJ9kIXg

    the electribe app just rocks! the other iPad apps i use are

    Bebot (its an iphone app but is an amazing usable finger board synth -la haken contiuum in the 2X mode) http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bebot-robot-synth/id300309944?mt=8

    and also the ac-7 pro control surface, which i have been using with my logic pro : http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ac-7-pro-control-surface/id363743042?mt=8

    and then there is this :)
    I already pre ordered mine. i environ a future, where big workstation synths will be just midi controllers with an iPad slot, running our favorite softsynths and DAW software! first we moved the brain out of our synthesizers and moved to a distributed model (midi controller, soft synth modules..) and now we are moving back to putting a detachable brain back into our controllers :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=komJPnS9c6g

    missed posting the link!

    Ha, I was standing right next to the Akai iPod app and I didn’t see it because I was too busy looking at the new Live controller.

    And, apparently ReBirth does indeed work on the iPad. Too freaking cool!
    http://blog.dubspot.com/rebirth-ipad-music-app-reviews-propellerhead/

    I must preface my comment with the disclaimer that although I am well versed on computers and technology by trade, I am an amateur musician at best, so I don’t pretend to know more about these things than you do. However, I believe that for practical applications, the mobile display and processing device (i.e. laptop, ipad, etc), must be paired with a dedicated midi controller for full control, expresiveness and workflow optimization. A keyboard or small usb midi controller can sometimes get you part of the way there, but a pure tablet does not have or take well to either of these. I see the ipad as a useful device for non-real time editing like setting up drum patterns and arranging parts in a daw using touch technology. Any real time, dynamic kind of manipulations will suffer from a lack of feedback and accuracy inherent to touch screen displays. As long as the DAW software does not evolve to fully support this kind of interface, I wouldn’t run out to buy an iPad. It would be an uber cool toy, but not much more.

    I completely agree. It is still a toy. But, dang it is a cool one!

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